Weekly Wretched: Enterprise Earth - Embodiment


It's been two years since Enterprise Earth released their debut full length, Patient Ø through Stay Sick Recordings, but I know I'm definitely not alone in having counted the days since it was released until more Enterprise Earth goodness was delivered. And this past Friday, the long awaited follow up to Patient Ø finally dropped - Embodiment takes the band to a new level of death metal that separates these dudes from a lot of other bands in the genre. Embodiment lives up to the hype, without a doubt.

The album kicks off with wailing guitars on "Shroud of Flesh," the first of thirteen tracks on Embodiment. It's not long before the iconic and legendary vocals by Dan Watson break through the sound and his unique and disturbingly inhuman growls and higher-pitched screams penetrate your ears. In the days leading up to the release of Embodiment, Watson did a healthy amount of talking-up the guitar work on this album - something every band does these days - but Enterprise Earth more than deliver on what they said. The guitars fucking crush from beginning to end. There's definitely less of a focus on breakdown-heavy metal and more of a focus on good ol' guitar solos and death metal sound - but please do not get me wrong: for those who love a good breakdown, Embodiment has more than plenty to satisfy you, and they will bring you to your knees. "Mortem Incarnatum," one of the songs Enterprise Earth debuted prior to the release, has an absolutely insane breakdown that fans of the deathcore sound will no doubt approve of.

Everything about this record is just sick. From the smallest details of drum work, to the fast-fingered guitarists to the mind-blowing depths Dan Watson can take his vocal range to: Embodiment is a beautifully crafted compilation of death fucking metal. Literally every track on this kicks ass: "Empty Sockets," "Deathwind," and "Father of Abortion" are perfect songs for new listeners to the album to preview before going head-on into Embodiment. I've been jamming this album non-stop since it dropped, and there has yet to be a part of it that bores me or feels recycled or unoriginal. It feels like Enterprise Earth breathed fresh air into a heavily saturated scene and knew where they wanted to take this album from the beginning.

As an added bonus, Embodiment is a concept album about a man with schizophrenia. According to Watson, "The lyrics in Embodiment are the thoughts of a character in a story I wrote. The character perceives the world as if he was a god sent to the earth to live among humanity as one of them. To live as a mortal. A spiritual being shrouded in flesh to experience a life of pain. To truly judge someone you have to walk in their shoes to understand them. When the album drops I will be releasing the story chapter by chapter. Things aren't quite what they seem. The character in my story is schizophrenic. No one believes he is a god. No one believes he is more than human." If you're interested in just where this story goes from the writer's perspective, be sure to follow Dan Watson on Facebook, where he's already begun breaking down the story.

Overall, Embodiment is just what fans of Enterprise Earth both wanted and needed. It is a great next chapter for the band, and their hard work and effort that they put into writing it definitely shows: like I said, nothing on the record is boring and it will take you on a roller coaster through its high points and low points, and crushing you with EE's signature breakdown style in between. The great thing about this band that keeps me loving them is just how they manage to translate their sound live; I've been lucky enough to see them twice, my most recent time a single day before the release of Embodiment, where they played "Mortem Incarnatum" and "Father of Abortion" and they fucking killed it live - a feat some bands would struggle to do, believe it or not.

Check out the video below for "Mortem Incarnatum" and if you like what you hear, click here to pick up the album as well as give them a like on Facebook!


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